Into the Woods

into the woods - drifter and the gypsy blog
Have any of you seen the movie? I haven’t. BUT I’m really inspired by this editorial, also named Into the Woods, for Harper’s Bazaar UK. Except these woods are fields of flowers. (Quite contrary to the dark, eerie woods in the film and much more my speed!)

into the woods - drifter and the gypsy blog
into the woods - drifter and the gypsy blog
I had to laugh a bit when I saw that the styling was done by none other than Leith Clark (the founder of Lula Magazine who’s since moved on to Violet Book). Of course that’s why I love the styling. Of course.

into the woods - drifter and the gypsy blog
I love the blur and movement in this shot. It makes you feel like you’re falling. I can stare at it for days.

into the woods - drifter and the gypsy blog
Photography: Erik Madigan Heck
Styling: Leith Clark
Hair: Tomi Kono
Makeup: Deanna Melluso
Model: Katrin Thormann at Premier

Wonderful Unknown

wonderful unknown - drifter and the gypsy blog
I’ve been listening to a lot of Ingrid Michaelson lately. There’s something about her voice and lyrics that are so soothing and soulful but still quirky and nonsensical at the same time; a perfect blend of light and darkness. One of my favorite songs of hers is “Wonderful Unknown.”

wonderful unknown - drifter and the gypsy blog
wonderful unknown - drifter and the gypsy blog
wonderful unknown - drifter and the gypsy blog
The lyrics go, “Into the dark and wonderful unknown, let us go, let us go,” which, to me, means that we don’t know what twists and turns our life will take–which can be extremely scary at times–but it will all be okay. Perhaps the excitement of not knowing what the future holds is what’s wonderful about the unknown.

wonderful unknown - drifter and the gypsy blog
wonderful unknown - drifter and the gypsy blog
wonderful unknown - drifter and the gypsy blog
Oh these milkmaid braids. If only you could’ve seen them in real life. I love that my hair is getting long enough to braid, but it still has a while to go until I can do milkmaid braids. I put so many bobbi pins in this sucker I felt like a pin cushion!
wonderful unknown - drifter and the gypsy blog
wonderful unknown - drifter and the gypsy blog
I must warn you: Don’t look too closely at my hands. They always get SO DRY and wrinkly in the winter; there’s nothing I can do about them! Do yours get dry too? My mom jokes and says they look like an elephant’s skin. I’ve accepted the fact I’m never going to be a hand model. Le sigh. BUT deliverance is near! Spring is nigh!

wonderful unknown - drifter and the gypsy blog
wonderful unknown - drifter and the gypsy blog
wonderful unknown - drifter and the gypsy blog
wonderful unknown - drifter and the gypsy blog
wonderful unknown - drifter and the gypsy blog
wonderful unknown - drifter and the gypsy blog
Dress & Shoes: Crossroads Trading Co.
Tights: Hue
Necklace: H&M
Earrings: c/o Stephanie Simek

click here for more of my outfits.

Vice & Velvet

vice and velvet - drifter and the gypsy blog
vice and velvet - drifter and the gypsy blog
There’s not much more in the world that makes my heart tingle than good branding (and good styling and good photography and good drawing and good art in general but for the sake of this post, we’ll talk about the branding). I stumbled upon Vice & Velvet via Etsy’s Instagram feed.

vice and velvet - drifter and the gypsy blog
vice and velvet - drifter and the gypsy blog
vice and velvet - drifter and the gypsy blog
Vice & Velvet is a one-woman show run by Mei Ong of Melbourne, Australia. Her products range from body polish to bathing whip to what seems to be her specialty: soap–both in jewel and bar form. Everything is made with natural, fresh and vegan ingredients–stuff good enough to eat! Although… let’s just use these to pamper our bodies externally.

vice and velvet - drifter and the gypsy blog
vice and velvet - drifter and the gypsy blog
vice and velvet - drifter and the gypsy blog
vice and velvet - drifter and the gypsy blog
Learn more about Vice & Velvet here and shop Vice & Velvet here.

Billy Goat Hill Park

billy goat hill park - drifter and the gypsy blog
It’s amazing to me how I’ve lived in the Bay Area for nearly 8 years (in July!) but still have not yet seen all the parts of San Francisco. Billy Goat Hill Park has been on my list of places to visit ever since I found out about the famous rope swing.

On one day my dad had off from work, we all took a trip to the park.

billy goat hill park - drifter and the gypsy blog
The stairs leading down to the vista point.

billy goat hill park - drifter and the gypsy blog
billy goat hill park - drifter and the gypsy blog
It was a really clear day and you could see the city for miles.

billy goat hill park - drifter and the gypsy blog
billy goat hill park - drifter and the gypsy blog
billy goat hill park - drifter and the gypsy blog
billy goat hill park - drifter and the gypsy blog
billy goat hill park - drifter and the gypsy blog
A swing with a view.

billy goat hill park - drifter and the gypsy blog
I’m floating through the sky!

billy goat hill park - drifter and the gypsy blog
JK. The ground was like three feet beneath me. But still! It was a really high swing.

billy goat hill park - drifter and the gypsy blog
billy goat hill park - drifter and the gypsy blog
billy goat hill park - drifter and the gypsy blog
Of course I had to throw a cliché heart up in the air for the city I love.

billygoathillpark_19
San Francisco friends (or those who have visited), have you ever been to Billy Goat Hill Park? If not, I definitely recommend it. There’s not much to do there, but if you’re looking for a great Kodak Instagram moment, you’ve found the right place.

Weaving a Small Tapestry on a Potholder Loom

weaving a small tapestry on a potholder loom - drifter and the gypsy blog
weaving a small tapestry on a potholder loom - drifter and the gypsy blog
For those interested in creating miniature tapestries, you don’t need buy a large lap or tabletop loom or build your own; simply get yourself a potholder loom for around ten bucks and start weaving.

Materials:
– Potholder loom (I recommend the Wool Novelty metal loom; it’s more durable than cheap plastic looms and will last you forever)
– Large tapestry needle
Wide-toothed comb to use as a beater. (Tapestry beaters are expensive – just find yourself a small comb with wide, evenly spaced teeth. Look for a comb with no large ends, like mine has, as those can get in the way.)
– Thin cotton yarn/twine, single or two-ply wool yarn of your chosen color
– Thin scraps of fabric or roving
– Scissors
– Dowel rod or stick for hanging

weaving a small tapestry on a potholder loom - drifter and the gypsy blog
Steps:

1. Wind your warp. Warp thread acts as the blank canvas for your weaving and will barely be seen once the tapestry is done. Use a thin, strong cotton yarn or twine for your warp thread.

2. Knot the thread at the top lefthand corner of the loom, then wind it vertically up and down across all pegs, being careful to keep tension even as you go; the warp should be wound tightly but not too tightly, with a bit of give.

3. Knot the warp end at the bottom righthand corner. Ignore the loom pegs on the left and right sides, as you will only be using two sides of the pegs to create your tapestry.

4. Start weaving! The weft is the horizontal thread and the body of your tapestry. To do a standard tabby (plain) weave, attach the yarn to your needle, begin at the top of your weaving and wind the thread into the warp, alternating over and under between each warp thread.

weaving a small tapestry on a potholder loom - drifter and the gypsy blog
5. When you reach the end of the row, start on the next row underneath, this time alternating over and under on the opposite warp thread. Make sure to leave enough give so the yarn doesn’t pull the weaving inward into an hourglass shape, which will happen if the yarn is too tightly woven.

6. Use your wide toothed comb to beat/squish the yarn upwards so you see very little of the warp. Weave the yarn ends into the tapestry, allowing the very end of the yarn to poke out the back where it won’t be seen.

Don’t limit yourself to just wool yarn–weave in bits of roving, fabric scraps, cotton cord, and all sorts of odds and ends to add a more interesting texture to your tapestry.

7. Finish the tapestry with fringe. Cut strings of yarn around 20 inches long, group them together depending on how thick you want the fringe to be and attach to the warp (see photos). To complete the tapestry, carefully pull the weaving off the loom, slide your dowel rod/stick through the warp loop ends at the top of the weaving and hang.

weaving a small tapestry on a potholder loom - drifter and the gypsy blog
Potholder looms are generally 7 x 7 inches and can create tapestries up to 6 x 6 inches in size – or tinier if you weave a smaller warp. Happy weaving!

weaving a small tapestry on a potholder loom - drifter and the gypsy blog
weaving a small tapestry on a potholder loom - drifter and the gypsy blog
Lauren (Sew Contributor)

click here for more diy sew.

The Daykeeper: Your Year in Moments (2015)

the daykeeper datebook 2015 - drifter and the gypsy blog
the daykeeper datebook 2015 - drifter and the gypsy blog
I’d like to introduce you to the newest venture of my dear friend, Katrina: The Daykeeper. Okay so it’s not completely new–I actually wrote about the datebook’s 2014 inception (which was a HUGE success) here. BUT I feel like this year was an even BIGGER success for The Daykeeper (complete with a beautiful launch party) because it sold out before I even had time to write this blog post! I promise I’ll be more timely in writing about the Daykeeper 2016 (2016 whaattt??!!) edition so you guys can get your hands on a copy of THAT loveliness before it’s all sold out.

the daykeeper datebook 2015 - drifter and the gypsy blog
the daykeeper datebook 2015 - drifter and the gypsy blog
the daykeeper datebook 2015 - drifter and the gypsy blog
The beautiful manifesto was hand lettered by Abbey Sy.

the daykeeper datebook 2015 - drifter and the gypsy blog
Do you recognize the title page from my outing with Katrina over the summer?

the daykeeper datebook 2015 - drifter and the gypsy blog
The Daykeeper comes with postcards you can send to your loved ones while you are away on your adventures. It also comes with a small pocket for storing little paper souvenirs you collect from your trips.

Katrina made an incredible video to accompany the Daykeeper. I highly suggest you watch it. You may find a few clips of yours truly here and there;)

the daykeeper datebook 2015 - drifter and the gypsy blog
the daykeeper datebook 2015 - drifter and the gypsy blog
2015: Amazing things will happen. ♥

Do you keep a planner too?

Photos 1, 4, 5, 7 & 8 are by Katrina, the rest are by me.

Turn Down for What

turn down for what - drifter and the gypsy blog
Tell me you didn’t have this song playing in your head when you read the title. It’s a killer workout song AND it’s a great motivational line to get your butt in gear for achieving awesome things in life. Which is why I LOVE this banner collaboration between EmmaJaneNation (a blogger & photographer) and Zana (an awesome South African brand you should totally know about if you don’t already).

turn down for what - drifter and the gypsy blog
The Turn Down for What song is pretty grungy rap (a.k.a. not my style), so of course I love the girlified banner version of the lyrics in pink.

turn down for what - drifter and the gypsy blog
The collaboration was limited edition, with only 15 banners printed. I’m super sad that they’re all sold out. I would love to have one in my office.

turn down for what - drifter and the gypsy blog
Do you have a motivational mantra you tell yourself?

Photos via EmmaJaneNation & Zana

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