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DIY Craft: Wrapped Color Block Rope Bracelet

diy craft: wrapped color blocked rope bracelets - drifter and the gypsy blog

Hi guys! Dani here again, with a nifty fashion craft project to share with you! Rope is a favorite crafting material of mine. Besides the fact I love the calico look of rope and there really isn’t another bracelet material out there that is soft and comfy in the same way rope is. Plus it’s so affordable and you can use it for basically everything!

diy craft: wrapped color blocked rope bracelets - drifter and the gypsy blog

For this project you will need approximately 18 inches of rope per bracelet, very sharp scissors, sewing needles, and 1 spool of embroidery thread in at least 3 colors. I used rope in three different thicknesses for three bracelets, so don’t be afraid to experiment with your bracelet styles!

diy craft: wrapped color blocked rope bracelets - drifter and the gypsy blog

1. Start by measuring out a circle of rope when doubled on itself is just big enough to fit over your wrist.

2. Using sewing needles, pin the ends of the rope back down onto itself so that it overlaps the body of the circle.

diy craft: wrapped color blocked rope bracelets - drifter and the gypsy blog

3. Start around 1 inch from one end of the rope and take your first color of embroidery thread. Tie it tightly and securely around both overlapping pieces of rope.

4. Wrap the thread around the rope tightly, trying to keep the thread in uniform lines that overlap. You don’t want to have any gaps between the thread but the thread should still lay relatively flat. Continue wrapping until you have covered around 1 inch of rope.

diy craft: wrapped color blocked rope bracelets - drifter and the gypsy blog

5. To start a new color, wrap the next piece of thread around the end of the previous and tie the two threads together around the rope, with the knot on the inside of the bracelet – you can cover this up as you wrap the next color. Trim away the first color thread and repeat the wrapping process, this time in a smaller block. Repeat with varying colors of thread, at alternating thicknesses until you have covered around 1/3 of the rope circle.

6. Tie off the last color and knot securely. Using a pair of sharp scissors, trim away the excess rope from each end of the wrapped area so that only about 1/2-3/4 inch is still showing. Trim away any loose threads.

diy craft: wrapped color blocked rope bracelets - drifter and the gypsy blog
diy craft: wrapped color blocked rope bracelets - drifter and the gypsy blog

Dani (DIY Craft contributor)

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DIY Craft: iPad and Kindle Case

Hi guys! I’m excited to introduce Cat from the blog Take Courage as a new DIY Contributor to Drifter & the Gypsy. I’m a huge fan of Cat’s craft tutorials and am happy to have her contributing a (second) monthly DIY Craft column (in addition to our fabulous current DIY Crafter, Dani) here on the blog. Read more about Cat on the contributor’s page here.

Hello there – I’m Cat from Take Courage and I’ll be popping by every month to share a crafty DIY with you all! I’ve got to say, this DIY iPad / Kindle case has to be one of my most favorite DIYs and it’s really simple to make – promise!

diy craft: ipad/kindle case - drifter and the gypsy blog

You will need:

An old and very dull hardback book

Wrapping paper

Cardboard

Elastic

PVA or bookbinders glue

Sticky tape

Scissors

Stanley knife

diy craft: ipad/kindle case - drifter and the gypsy blog

Step 1: Carefully cut out the pages from your hardback book – use a very old and very dull book so you don’t feel as bad tearing it up!

diy craft: ipad/kindle case - drifter and the gypsy blog
diy craft: ipad/kindle case - drifter and the gypsy blog
diy craft: ipad/kindle case - drifter and the gypsy blog

Step 2: Cut a piece of paper about half an inch larger than the hardback book’s cover when laid flat. Glue the paper to the outside of the cover, folding the excess edges over the inside of the cover and smoothing out the paper to avoid any air bubbles or wrinkles. Secure the inside edges with sticky tape.

diy craft: ipad/kindle case - drifter and the gypsy blog

Step 3: Cut another piece of paper which is very slightly smaller in height than the inside of your book cover. In respect of the width, the paper only needs to be about two thirds of the width of the cover – you’ll see why in a moment! Glue the paper to the inside of the cover, making sure to cover the left side and center in full.

diy craft: ipad/kindle case - drifter and the gypsy blog

Steps 4 & 5: Cut a piece of cardboard just a little smaller than the right side of the book cover – this will become the base for your Kindle / iPad / other electronic whatnot and is the reason why you didn’t need to cover the entire inside of your case! Cover the cardboard in paper (you could use a contrasting paper if you fancy) and secure the edges with lots of sticky tape – no need to worry if the backside of the cardboard piece is messy, you won’t be able to see it once it’s finished.

diy craft: ipad/kindle case - drifter and the gypsy blog
diy craft: ipad/kindle case - drifter and the gypsy blog

Step 6: Now the tricky part. Take some elastic and wrap it around your kindle / iPad and the cardboard piece to measure how much you will need for each corner. Be careful to ensure that the elastic pieces aren’t too long – they need to be slightly on the small side, so as to allow the elasticity to hold your kindle / iPad in place. Wrap the elastic around each corner of the cardboard and secure with plenty of sticky tape.

diy craft: ipad/kindle case - drifter and the gypsy blog
diy craft: ipad/kindle case - drifter and the gypsy blog

Steps 7 & 8: Once the four elastic corners are in place, measure a long piece of elastic which will wrap around the entire cover to keep it closed while knocking around in your bag. Stick to the backside of the cardboard piece, about an inch or so from the right-hand side (if facing the right way). Using lots and lots of glue, stick the cardboard piece to the right side of the cover. Plop a big pile of books on top and leave to dry (overnight preferably).

diy craft: ipad/kindle case - drifter and the gypsy blog

Et voilà! A pretty custom-made case for your kindle or iPad which costs next to nothing and looks fabulous!

diy craft: ipad/kindle case - drifter and the gypsy blog

Stay tuned next month for my next DIY Craft!

Cat (DIY Craft Contributor)

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DIY Craft: Patterned coasters

diy craft: patterned coasters - drifter and the gypsy blog
diy craft: patterned coasters - drifter and the gypsy blog

Hi there lovely Drifter & the Gypsy readers. Dani of High Walls here. I’m back again to share a new craft DIY with you!

Way back when, my very first DIY project for Micaela was some painted citrus coasters. Adorable as they are (and they are super cute!) sometimes you want something a little more understated. As a lover of both spots and vibrant colors I came up with this great project to make some pretty patterned coasters in any color that catches your fancy!

You’re going to need a sheet of felt; you want to get the type that is fairly stiff, kind of like cardboard. You also need nail polish in a different color, a wooden skewer and some scissors.

diy craft: patterned coasters - drifter and the gypsy blog

1. Take the wooden skewer and dip the flat end it into the nail polish so that the top is coated completely. Starting from one corner, stamp the end onto the felt to create small colored dots on the fabric. Alternate dot positions as you go, and continue to dip the skewer into the nail polish as it runs out. You may want to practice on a scrap piece of fabric first if you aren’t feeling confident. Don’t worry about making the dots evenly spaced, just stamp them freely so each coaster will be unique.

diy craft: patterned coasters - drifter and the gypsy blog

2. After allowing too dry for an hour, check your dots to see if they are dark enough for your liking. If you want to make them stand out more, carefully stamp over each dot again to deepen the color. You can even add a second or third color if you want to have different colors. I chose to stick with white on yellow.

diy craft: patterned coasters - drifter and the gypsy blog

3. Once it has completely dried, turn the felt over and lightly mark out two rows of squares on the back. With my piece of felt I was able to twelve 4 in x 4 in coasters. Carefully cut along the marked lines and discard any off cuts and you’re ready to go!

diy craft: patterned coasters - drifter and the gypsy blog

4. Use them straight away or tie the whole stack together with a piece of twine or ribbon and give them as a gift! How easy is that!

diy craft: patterned coasters - drifter and the gypsy blog
diy craft: patterned coasters - drifter and the gypsy blog
diy craft: patterned coasters - drifter and the gypsy blog

Dani (DIY Craft contributor)

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DIY Craft: Clay Ring Bowl

diy craft: clay ring bowl - drifter and the gypsy blog

Despite the fact that I have numerous well organized jewelry boxes, I always find my favorite pieces that I wear daily end up sitting on my bathroom sink most days. When I know I’ll most likely be wearing those earrings or that ring again tomorrow, it doesn’t seem worth putting it away at the end of each day. What I need is a little ring bowl to keep my favorite delicates safe and sound from day to day. Sure, you could use an old dish from the kitchen, but why would you when making your own custom made bowl is so easy?!

You will need: Air dry clay, a rolling pin, a bowl or plate, a knife and a nail file.

Method:

diy craft: clay ring bowl - drifter and the gypsy blog

1. Cut off a lump of clay roughly 3” x  3” and knead it between your palms until soft and easily pliable. If you find that the clay is breaking or starting to crumble, wet your hands slightly and continue to knead the added moisture into the clay.
2. On a dry, flat surface, roll out the clay with a rolling pin until around 1/4 of an inch in thickness. Turn the clay over in between rolls to ensure that it doesn’t stick to the surface.

diy craft: clay ring bowl - drifter and the gypsy blog

3. Using a bowl or plate as a guide, cut out a circle from the roll out clay. Reserve the left over clay in an air tight container for the next time you need it. Smooth out any rough edges from your circle.
4. Take the bowl from the previous step and turn it over so the underside is showing. Carefully press the circle of clay onto the bowl, pressing down with your palms so that the clay forms into the same shape as the bowl. For a smooth, round bowl use the same bowl that you used for the last step. If you prefer a more irregular shape, use a bowl that is slightly smaller than the one previously used.

diy craft: clay ring bowl - drifter and the gypsy blog

5. Wet your hands again and gently wipe away any imperfections on the bowl. The water will help to smooth the clay without leaving indents. Set the bowl aside the dry.
6. After roughly 1 hour, check on your bowl. It should be firm but still cool to the touch. At this point you can carefully ease the clay from the bowl and allow it to dry completely overnight.

diy craft: clay ring bowl - drifter and the gypsy blog

7. Once completely dry, take an old nail file or emery board and file away any rough edges from the rim of the clay bowl. File in a circular motion to avoid leaving marks. Wipe over with a dry cloth when you are finished.
8. If you would like to decorate your bowl you can do so now; I used a gold paint pen that you can get from most craft stores, but basic craft paints will also work just as well – just be careful not to use too much water as the clay will soak it up and the color can run!

diy craft: clay ring bowl - drifter and the gypsy blog
diy craft: clay ring bowl - drifter and the gypsy blog

Dani (DIY Craft contributor)

click here for more diy craft!

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DIY Craft: Beaded Pot Holders

diy craft: beaded pot holder - drifter and the gypsy blog

There is nothing worse than finishing a delicious meal only to find that your hot plates and pots have marked your table. In our house we cook a lot of oven baked dishes that are served straight from the oven, so to combat this we usually put down hand towels or dish cloths to protect the table. Kind of ruins my beautifully set table settings, dontcha think?

To return my table to its former glory I made a couple of sets of Beaded Pot Holders. They were so easy to make and look so awesome, I thought I would share the process with you guys!

You’re going to need a whole lot of wooden beads. I used about 60 beads at a 1/2 inch (1.5cm) size to make an 8 inch (20cm) in diameter holder. The size of your beads will determine how big your pot holder is, so it’s a good idea to get more than you think you’ll need – just in case! The other thing you’re going to need to remember is to get wooden beads. Plastic beads will obviously warp or melt under high heats. The same goes for colored beads: if your beads are painted with a thicker, acrylic paint, it is likely the paint will peel  away under heat, so look for naturally dyed beads. I was able to find a whole bunch at my local craft store.

diy craft: beaded pot holder - drifter and the gypsy blog

Materials:

Wooden beads (approx. 60-80 per holder)
Leather cord or thick twine
Scissors
Sewing needle and thread (optional)

diy craft: beaded pot holder - drifter and the gypsy blog

Instructions:

1. Take your cord and cut a length of around half a meter. Knot one end securely, ensuring that your knot is larger than the holes on your beads. Leave around 10cm of cord before the knot.
2. One at a time thread your beads onto your cord. Continue until you have used all your beads.
3. Loosely tie off the open end of cord around 5cm away from the beads. Then push all of your beads so that they sit fairly flush against the original knot.
4. There are two ways you can proceed from here, depending on the size of your pot holder and how ‘secure’ you want it:

diy craft: beaded pot holder - drifter and the gypsy blog

OPTION ONE:  take the first 10 (or so) beads and twist into a loop, knotting any excess cord around the cord (ie: between the 10th and 11th bead). Wrap the rest of the beads around the first loop, creating a second larger loop and knot again when the rope of beads reaches the first. Repeat again to make another larger loops and knot again (repeat again if necessary). Tie off the last loop against both the previous loop and the end of the cord. Add in a few lengths of cord to the knot to make a tasseled end.

diy craft: beaded pot holder - drifter and the gypsy blog

OPTION TWO: Twist the beaded rope around itself repeatedly to make a spiralled loop. Place down on a flat surface so that all the beads sit flush. Take a needle and thread and carefully stitch a knot between the original knot and the first row of beads. Sew a zigzag between the alternating gaps between the beads, pulling the rows together. Continue this process all the way around. Your threads will be exposed in some areas, but it will only be on one side. You can simply flip the holder over once you’re done. This option is quite fiddly and takes a bit more time, but it will result in a sturdier pot holder. I would recommend this option for larger pots.

diy craft: beaded pot holder - drifter and the gypsy blog

And that’s it! I made a whole set of blue and cream pot holders for our family, now everyone has one! They are perfect for pot pies and casseroles, and my table has returned to its pretty beginnings! (Thanks goodness!)

diy craft: beaded pot holder - drifter and the gypsy blog

Dani (DIY Craft contributor)

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DIY Craft: Decorative Cardboard Letters

diy craft: cardboard letters - drifter and the gypsy blog

Hi there lovely readers, Dani from the blog High Walls here to share a story and crafty project for you to try at home.

I was perusing my favorite home ware store the other day when I found myself in front of this giant display of decorative letters in various colors and styles. Immediately I found myself imagining all the different ways I could display initials or words around my home: on the walls or over my mantle, or even in my kitchen. I was 100% ready to snap up a few sets when I suddenly caught sight of the price tag… $15 PER LETTER? I’m sorry, but my bank balance won’t abide by those kind of prices! The letters stayed in the store, and instead I went home and whipped up a few crafty versions of my own.

Materials:
Patterned or colored card stock
Washi tape or invisible tape
Pencil and eraser
Scissors
A ruler

diy craft: decorative cardboard letters - drifter and the gypsy blog

Instructions:
1. Start by sketching out your letters on the front side of your card, using the ruler. You want each letter to be in block form and of even sizing. Measure out each side precisely. My letters are 6 in (15 cm) high and each ‘arm’ of the letter is 1 in (3 cm) wide.
2. Using your eraser, gently erase away any mistakes or excess lines and cut out your first letter.
3. Repeat step one to make a second letter, only this time sketch it out on the back side of the card so that it will be a mirror image of your original letter.
4. Set your letters aside, and cut strips of your card to make the sides of your letters – again, mine were 1 in (3 cm) thick and each was around the length of an A4 sheet of paper. I needed two for each letter, so cut a few.
5. One at a time, measure one side of your letter and then measure out the same distance on one of the strips you just cut. At the measured point, fold the strip over to mark the end of that side. Moving around the edge of the letter, repeat the process of measuring the distance of the edge and matching it to the strip of paper. As you fold the strip should hopefully start to form the shape of your letter. If you run out of room on the first strip, start again with the second – you can join the two later.

diy craft: decorative cardboard letters - drifter and the gypsy blog

6. Once you have all the pieces ready to join, attach the side to your front letter with the tape, starting from the first sectioned off fold you made. If using Washi tape, try to ensure that the tape sits evenly over the joins for a polished end look.
7. Slowly and carefully, make your way around the edge, taping the side pieces to the letter front. This can be a fiddly process so take it slowly.
8. You should now have an empty 3D letter – from this point you can do one of two things:
- If you decide to leave the letter empty and simply attach the rear piece to the sides and then display as is – stick to the wall, hang from a mobile, sit on a shelf
- For heavier letters, fill the inside with rice or pebbles prior to attaching the rear piece. You can then use your letters as book ends of paper weights or just to sturdy up your shelf display

diy craft: decorative cardboard letters - drifter and the gypsy blog
diy craft: decorative cardboard letters - drifter and the gypsy blog

Using this method, you can make a whole alphabet of letters for less than the price of one store bought letter. How can you go wrong with a bargain like that?

Dani (DIY Craft contributor)

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DIY Craft: Leaf Candle Holder

diy craft: leaf candle holder - drifter and the gypsy blog

Hi everyone! Dani here from High Walls with a DIY Craft project for all of you nature lovers out there!

Maybe it’s Autumn where you are and the trees and leaves are in lovely warm hues. Perhaps, like for me, it’s Summer and everything is green and bright. Even if it’s already coming into winter in your part of the world, you can use this wonderfully simple DIY project to bring a little bit of the outdoors in! Collect some pretty leaves and twigs from around your garden or neighborhood and you can put together these pretty little candle holders to decorate your home.

Materials:

Leaves in various shapes and sizes
Small Glass tumblers
Double Sided Tape
Scissors
Twine/String
Tea Light Candles

diy craft: leaf candle holder - drifter and the gypsy blog

Method:

1. Collect some leaves/branches from the garden to use. You want leaves that are as tall as your glass and preferably thinner so that they can wrap around the glass without breaking. Separate the leaves from the branches and sort into groups. I used three different sets of leaves – tall stems to use as a base, small long leaves and pretty seeded ‘flower’s as decoration.

diy craft: leaf candle holder - drifter and the gypsy blog

2. Run a line of double sided tape around the outside of glass about 1/3 of the way down and just about the base of the glass.

diy craft: leaf candle holder - drifter and the gypsy blog

3. Starting from one side, press the first base leaf onto the tape. Repeat with another leaf, overlapping the first. Continue all the way around the glass until you have covered the surface completely. It doesn’t matter if you can see the glass through the leaves.

diy craft: leaf candle holder - drifter and the gypsy blog

4. Take a length of twine or string that is at least twice as long as the diameter of the glass. Leaving around 2 in (5 cm) at the end, use your thumb to anchor the string and start to layer the decoration leaves upon the base row, using the string the anchor the new leaves. Continue around the glass until you are back at the beginning. This can be a little fiddly, so feel free to use a table to steady your hand.

diy craft: leaf candle holder - drifter and the gypsy blog

5. Tie off the twine (using the 2 in end you left in the previous step) and adjust any of the leaves that may have slipped in the process. Wrap the rest of the twine around the glass and tuck into the other row of twine.

diy craft: leaf candle holder - drifter and the gypsy blog

6. Place a single tea light candle into each glass and light up to admire the pretty dappled light that flickers from between the leaves.

What’s great about this project is that it’s temporary. Your leaves will eventually break down and when they do, you can easily remove the string and tape and reclaim your glass tumblers to use as drinking glasses again.

Dani (DIY Craft contributor)

click here for more diy craft!

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